About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CSPAN 39
LANGUAGE
English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
and former chancellor of new york city public-school, joel klein, hosted by the foundation for excellence and education. this is about an hour. >> welcome to this evening's bought test of morning joe. [laughter] the energy in this room is nice. how this issue of educational reform has ripened, the combination of need, the talent we see in this room. there is a sense that the moment has a ride. the other is jeb bush. i am a great believer that two things matter in life -- ideas and people. that is the driver of change in history. jeb is a perfect example of in what he is doing. he is the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. the fact that you are here is the greatest salute you could give. condie and that, the the national security background. we used to mess around with something called the rand bond calculated. it used to calculate the cep, t he circular error robert roe -- error probable. are today. we have travelled a considerable distance. when asked what the great -- the greatest national-security threat is, he did not say al qaeda, iran, north korea, what he said w
are battle zones. it is a city that has a big middle class that was a thriving commercial hub, and people do not know what is going to happen. physically, do a spot check points over the place. this used to be one of the most secure capitals of the middle east. host: where is president assad at the moment? caller: we seldom see him. occasionally he will make a public appearance. by and large, i think he is invisible. he is not highly visible for someone who was made such a determined effort to stay in power, despite what is happened to his country. occasionally he will give an interview to the foreign press or even the national press. he is more visible in posters at this point. host: the "l.a. times" bureau chief joining us here in washington. you can'm wondering if provide an update on what is happening in tripoli from your vantage point. caller: i just spent a couple of days up there. it is the second set of web and on. -- city of lebanon. sunni muslims car the prevalent population and prevalent rebel group. there's been periodic combat there between sunni gunmen and people who are part o
extent. the problem was, it was not a high-speed rail project. it was an important inner-city passenger way. i tried to negotiate with the governor and others. there were other interests in the state that wanted to go all the way to tampa. the governor review did. there were concerns about the length of the tourist area to tampa. it is a no-brainer. it should be built, it can be built. it could be self sustaining. it can be a great product. but connected the compromise to build it in phases. there are only two left in the united states now. the secretary and i did all we could in our power to make that happen and it did not happen. the money did come back. i was pleased a good portion of it did go into the northeast corridor. we cannot do that piecemeal. we need to do it and get it done not in 30 years but a fraction of that time. we can make it happen. one reason i came back is to get that done. we will figure out a way. a multibillion-dollar project in california, and will not be a dog. we want success. we need a plan. we will work with folks. we need to expedite it. then we need to s
tunnel in the world in the brooklyn battery tunnel. i take it almost every day i'm in new york city because my home in brooklyn is connected to it. it was totally filled with water. both tubes, from one end to the other, from the manhattan end to the brooklyn end. ere were close to 100 million gallons of water that had to be pumped out of that tunnel and it's still not back up to snuff. that's one of many examples. there's so many. the mta did a very good job. i want to congratulate joe lhota. they moved their rolling stock to high ground. tried to barricade this awful flood in the best way they could. boy, it's awful. the mta is the largest public transportation system in the country. it's the life blood of new york. it's our circulatory system. 3.5 million people g on and off manhattan island every day to work. wow. 3.5 million people. i guess that's more than the people in mississippi and probably more than the people in dade county, any way. and we depend on it. 2.63 billion trips a year. as i said, the mta took a lot of necessary precautions. but this is 108-year-old system. it
life of albany capital city. here is the mayor talking about the city. [video clip] >> it is the capital of the greatest aid until the country as far as i am concerned. we have a great history people want to know about. it is a great story to tell. every group would enter the world -- 97,000 population -- 98,000. we just about double every day with the number of workers that come in. you have your other businesses and people coming to the city. there are challenges no doubt like every urban city here in new york and across the country. is the attitude about urban education and how many kids we are losing their are not graduating from schools. basically saying, we have an issue here we have to deal with. i try to discuss that with other mayors across the state and with the decision makers. we have to come up with solutions. it is a burden for a lot of cities, not just school taxes but property taxes and trying to balance the budget to provide the services needed. this are two major problems. this is a very old city. we have a lot of beautiful historic buildings. and
that flies world war ii here to see this memorial at no cost. they fly from 117 cities from across the country and have flown over 100,000 veterans to date. for the past two years, my business partners and i and our team at precinct media, have all of the veterans and volunteers from the awesome stars and stripes honor flight in milwaukee. it is my honor to direct your attention to two world war ii veterans with us today. they are amazing guys and have become a very good friends. i would first like to acknowledge julian and his daughter julie. [applause] he served in the navy as a cook and also on the burial disposal units were he buried both japanese and american soldiers. he is a published poet and took his first trip to washington, d.c., on and on a flight. next and what to tell you about joe. he is a company today by his wife. [applause] many of you know joe but you might not know why. that picture was taken of him in 1945 for the life magazine. he was called the human skeleton, weighing only 70 pounds. after suffering in a prison camp, his photograph became one of the most ico
. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. >> [applause] >> can she borrow your stool? >> this is my wife kim and her
to be read occupied one power that came back. -- homes not elevated were often destroyed. city-wide mitigation may be more effective strategy. i would also caution about going underground. everything in manhattan was underground including hospitals and emergency room that were flooded by salt water and destroyed. where does it make sense to talk about this on a homeowner basis? where is this talk that we will have to look at mitigating a part of a community that piece by piece will not address the overall impacts. we are going to work with gail glass and state and with the science community. -- with the scientists and the state and with the science community. once you get into a dense urban area, the solution will not work. we have to focus on that type of infrastructure and the best way to mitigate future damage. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. in your area when katrina hit, you showed what persistence to make sure your area was treated fairly. even though i must tell you many of us were not a joyful to hear your requests but never the less the outcome was great. you hav
to the foundation's intent to sue the city for its city seal which contained a cross and a billboard that included elements of that city seal that was in a city park. mr. speaker, this is an outrage. the seal and sign are harming no one. they are widely embringsed by the citizens of bulla kansas. it contains the words values and progressive ideas. unfortunately in this case progressive ideas are making a war on traditional values and it's high time for that to stop. some will claim the first amendment to the constitution requires the cross be removed from this seal and sign. that's hogwash. the first amendment begins with the words congress shall make no law prohibiting the free exercise thereof. in this instance congress made no law. for that reason alone the first amendment does not apply. furthermore, it cannot be set that this simple seal in any way is an establishment of religion. there is no officially supported secretary or denomination in the manner, this is not in any way an endorsement of any particular religion or any religious denomination. in short the first amendment as originally wr
, is still -- parts are without power. we're going on six weeks now. in many parts of the city and the region we're really pushed back decades for the last six weeks. it's kind of hard to understand unless you've been there. and i think mr. boehner -- speaker boehner is sensitive to that. his remarks have been very positive. that we need to address the needs of the people and deal with the payment for that later. i would hope this would not get embroiled in what already seems to be, by many americans, insurmountable problems. this should not be insurmountable. we should address it and we will have to deal with it at some point. but this needs to be addressed immediately. >> any of us who have been affected by a natural disaster, in our case in california, earthquakes, floods, fire, whatever, but the moment when the people look to the public sector to say, do we really have this compact, are you there for us? when the storms hit last time into the new york area, our members came to us and said the devastation was so great that it has changed in some ways the character of our communities. the s
question -- what should be the president's number one agenda. next up is christine from new york city on the independent line. caller: good morning. i believe the president will not be able to accomplish his agenda without doing something that i believe is supported by the majority of the american people, that is the critical need for campaign finance reform to restore us to democracy that the people are represented at intergovernment instead of special interests. if we got campaign finance reform enacted, i know john mccain wanted it and a lot of other people -- we could then move on to do what we desperately need to do, which is begin to address the climate crisis. it is all over the world. venice, italy is flooded. a tornado in italy the other day. japan just had another tsunami. the disaster of sewage and leaks. the climate apex for a meeting was just a in dubai. they came to the conclusion that climate change is over use of fossil fuels and natural gas and oil. the amount of fossil fuels utilize by countries with huge populations such as india and china. we need energy, but we ne
at the literary life of new york's capital city, albany. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span 3. >> house speaker john boehner told reporters the white house has wasted another week in negotiations of the fiscal cliff. this is about five minutes. >> good morning. this is not a progress report. there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. 8 days ago, secretary geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on. it had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts and an infinite increase in the death lemmas like forever. four days ago we offered a serious proposal. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president thought the tax rate hikes he wanted, we wou
:00have a goo. >> explore the history and literary coulter of a new york's capital city, albany. they all today on c-span, a secretary of defense leon panetta visits the walter reed medical center followed by david coombs, bradley manning's of turning. the hearing on the republic of mali. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3. they're going to say that this president. >> they decided it was constitutional for them to establish i.d.s they did not say all of those states. >> correct. let me finish. you are misrepresenting what i am saying. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon p
culture of new york for a capital city albany on c-span2 and c-span3. next, president obama likes the national christmas tree. after that, the capital -- capitol christmas tree lighting with john boehner. tomorrow, on washington journal, guests discussed the latest on the so-called fiscal cliff negotiations and the week ahead. a politico reporter looks at the lobbyist involvement in those negotiations. and an update on the situation in syria. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c- span. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 63, i believe and they are going to say that is president. and indiana -- >> we are talking about facts. when they decided the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish it. they did not say all the states -- >> correct. they talked about indiana. let me finish peeping >> you are misrepresenting. >> no, i am not. >> i hear these accusations that black people, a voter i.d. lost disproportionately affect minorities. it implies to me that we have something missing in our brains. to me, if white americans can get it to v
to the veterans. they fly from 117 cities from across the country and had flown over 100,000 veterans to date. for the past two years, by business partners and our team at freethink media have followed the veterans from the stars and stripes organization in milwaukee. there are two veterans here today that are amazing guys who have become my friends. there is julian. [applause] julian and served on the navy -- in the navy. . he is a published poet. he took his first trip to washington d.c. on and on our flight. next, i want to tell you about joe. he is gone -- he is accompanied today by his wife terese. many of you no joke, but you might not know why. his picture was taken in 1945 for the "life magazine." it was called the human skeleton, weighing only 70 pounds. his photograph became one of the most iconic images of world war two. it is only fitting that today is joe's 87th birthday. [applause] gio and julian's stories have been submitted to the veterans history project at the library of congress. for years and years, researchers and documentarian's can use those stories for their future pro
chance to earn a good living anda few weeks ago i was giving a speech at a fancy hotel in new york city. when i arrived in the banquet hall, i was approached by a group of u employees like the ones were working here tonight in the hotel's catering department. they had heard the story and had a gift for me. it presented me with this employee name tag -- rubio, bartender. [laughter] [applause] do you know what this reminds me of? this reminds me that there are millions of marco rubio's out there. they are not looking for a handout. all they want is a chance to vie for their families, that there are not enough jobs out there. many do not have the skills for jobs that are available. they want a chance to earn a life for themselves in a better future for the children. what better chance than now? it all starts with the people in the kitchens of our hotels and the landscaping crews that work in our neighborhoods and the late-night janitorial shifts that clean our offices -- that is where you will find the dreams that america was builttheir journey is our nation's destiny. what our parents gav
york, capital city. our producers gathered about programming while they were there. there are traveling to state capital to feature history and literary life as he will see from albany, new york. the two c-span.org/local content. here is a clip. a project funded by the library of congress. [video clip] >> it includes all of the states, every state in the union has at least one talking book library. the design is to be shored that everywhere, this idea of equal access to materials is fulfilled. in new york, the port of entry is your local library. you can go into any public library, you can go up into a school library or academic libraries in new york. if you are printed disabled and you need help to be able to read materials or here or listen to print materials, the library's new connection to us. we make arrangements for people to have improved access. the service is one and that transition from books that used to be recorded pretty much on tape, the old cassette tape idea to using the latest in digital technology. we are excited about the transition because it makes it faster, cheaper
in the inner city where pimps are acting as your definition of slave owners. how do you respond to models like that? >> well, some people would argue that sex workers or prostitutes in the inner cities are victims of sex trafficking and others would argue they are not. it gets to that issue i put my finger on in terms of what constituteso kergs and involuntary labor? what is the alternative? then you deal with things like coercion doesn't just involve -- it is taking control over someone. i saw voodoo priests where they took over women and put a curse over them. never go to the police, and never do this, and they had great terror. i went to his shrine and he had photographs on the wall outside of the deformed women he cursed for breaking the rules. i spent 15 minutes with this guy, it was one of the most terrifying moments of my life. i have been shot at and this does not compare of being in the same room with this guy. there is no way to escape the fact that gender is pivotal to these issues. almost everywhere you go in the world, belonging to female gender is going to put you at significant
] >> explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city, albany, this weekend on booktv on c-span2. next, a forum on monday slavery and human trafficking. then a discussion about the state of public health in the u.s.. after that, the weekly address as a president obama and florida senator mark rubio. -- addresses of president obama and florida. tomorrow on "washington journal," stan collender and douglas holtx-eakin. an update on the situation in syria. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3, and they will say, that is president. india -- indiana voter id. >> they will decide the indiana case, it was constitutional for them to establish. they did not say that all of those states -- >> they talked about indiana. let me finish. you are rupert -- you're misrepresenting what i am saying. the supreme court is a lot of the land. >> when i hear these accusations of black people, boehner i.t. loss -- voter id laws, disproportionately affected minorities, it seems that we are <. today, t
seen cutting-edge defenses protect israel, cities and rural areas. we have seen israel fight for and win a stop to rocket fire from gaza. but we've also seen the challenge of turning a ceasefire into a lasting calm; of helping palestinians committed to peace find a more constructive path to pursue it; of putting israel's peace with egypt on a stronger foundation; of making sure that iran can never acquire a nuclear weapon. and just yesterday, as you know, the united nations general assembly voted to grant the palestinian authority non-member observer state status, a step that will not bring us any closer to peace. when it comes to a region full of uncertainty, upheaval, revolution, this much is constant and clear -- america and israel are in it together. this is a friendship that comes naturally to us. americans honor israel as a homeland dreamed of for generations and finally achieved by pioneering men and women in my lifetime. we share bedrock beliefs in freedom, equality, democracy, and the right to live without fear. what threatens israel threatens america, and what stren
according to a new survey. -- report. >> this weekend on c-span 3, the city prepares to mark the dropping of the atomic bomb in 1945. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. i do not want to argue. i think we are past that. my whole purpose for being here is to honor the dead and listen to to to accommodate what i can to say this as the happen again. >> we will be joined in washington to discuss meetings. >> the members of congress were told -- the committee also heard from advocacy groups in this hearing. >> the committee on oversight and government reform will come to order. this hearing on 1 in 88 children looks into the federal response of rising rates will come to order. americans have the right to know the money washingotn takes from them is well-spent. americans deserve an effective and efficient government that works for them. our duty is to protect these rights. our solemn obligation is to hold government accountable to taxpayers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we worked tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to bring genuine refor
at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany, saturday at noon eastern on "book tv" on c-span2 and on sunday on c-span3 on american history tv. washington journal continues. host: we want to welcome peter welch, chief deputy whip, also served on the oversight and government reform committee. thanks for being here. the fiscal cliff negotiations, the house gop put out their proposal yesterday. "usa today" has -- reaction?r guest: i disagree. on the revenue, with the speaker has proposed with $800 billion, there's no great increase. so-called cleaning up the tax code. the problem is you start going into the middle class and start having the middle class pay more money. on the revenue there is how much do we raise and where does it come from. had alear president obama specific proposal to raise the rates to the clinton era for the top two%. i think that is what will happen. there was a majority of republicans who agreed with that. second, on the 1.1 trillion entitlement cuts, that is really a bad idea. what is doing is approaching that by slashing benefits rather than reformi
the key cities of timbuktu, and nidal. any attempt to militarily oust aqim from the area must be african-led, it must be malian-led. it must be well planned, well organized and well resourced to be successful. military plans must also account for civilian security and humanitarian need. we support the efforts of the interim government of mali, ecowas, the african union, the united nations, neighboring states and others in the international community to prepare a military response in accordance with international law, address the threat of terrorists and extremists in northern mali. the threat of military force has contributed, we think, to a change in some of the northern groups, as witnessed by the recent willingness to have mnla and other members to renounce their efforts to establish an independent state in northern mali. the military concept proposed by ecowas and endorsed by the african union provides a found eags for planning a proposed military intervention in northern mali. however, several key questions must be answered to ensure that this response is well planned, well resource
are going on six weeks now. in many parts of the city in the region, we're really pushing back the decades and it is hard been there. i think the speaker is sensitive to that, the remarks are very positive that we need to address the needs of the people. i would hope that this would not get embroiled in what already seems to be insurmountable problems. immediately. >> the moment when the people look to the public sector to say, do we really have this contact? -- this compact? are you there for us? when the storms hit last time, in the new york area, the members came to us and said the devastation was so great, it changed the character of our community. the same thing can happen now people. i agree with you that the speaker has been gracious and open with what i have heard has to honoring the social compact that we are there in times of natural disaster to remove doubt in people's mind that this will not be a political debate but a values debate. let me just say to that -- this comes to mind -- when the bush administration came to us and said they needed funding. the chairman of the fed sai
culture of the new york capital city of albany this weekend on book-tv on c-span 2 and american history tv on c-span 3. today on c-span, "washington journal" next. james taylor will be at the national press club and this evening, a discussion about skilled immigrants with mark warner and aol founder steve case. in 45 minutes, the national correspondent for "fiscal times" on the fiscal cliff negotiations, a discussion and a look at the future energy production and consumption in
the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany, on c-span to and it c-span3. span3.c- [bell rings] >> this weekend on c-span3, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to hiroshima. >> everybody has their own view of what happened. survivalant to argue or about the history. i think we are past that. my goal for behing here is to honor the dead nand listen to the living and do what i can to ensure this does not happen again. >> he will discuss meetings with bomb survivors. sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. host: armstong williams, how do you see the fiscal cliff negotiations going? where do you see them going? guest: there is no doubt that the president signaled yesterday in his conversation to the speaker of the house, and no matter what the drumbeats of the politicians and activists may say to the media, there is no question he is committed to resolving this issue. you cannot resolve this issue bringing people back to certainty or to help business owners understand the liabilities they will face on january 1, 2013. there
yield back. >> i caution some of the terminal city -- terminology. i saw some of the proposals. them slow i freeze this blo speed trains to know where. i got a number of letters from illinois same that they were somewhere. >> that only are you forthright about everything, but your passion for high-speed rail is so evident. i want to know that there are plenty members that stair that and not just for where we live up for a network that would eventually run across this country. i think that you are right. you have to start with a vision and then begin to build on that. we have talked an awful lot about a bottom up approach for what states want the what states define for their own need versus the federal government. in the discussion about high speed rail, it seems to be quite the reverse. when the applications came in from the state to the department, did you all have to twist arms to get applications? >> absolutely not. when florida decided not to except $2.3 billion, we put out a notice for that money. we had $10 billion worth of request. >> we put a notice out. we were flooded with
weeks ago i was giving a speech at a fancy hotel in new york city. when i arrived in the banquet hall, i was approached by a group of u employees like the ones were working here tonight in the hotel's catering department. they had heard the story and had a gift for me. it presented me with this employee name tag -- rubio, bartender. [laughter] [applause] do you know what this reminds me of? this reminds me that there are millions of marco rubio's out there. they are not looking for a handout. all they want is a chance to vie for their families, that there are not enough jobs out there. many do not have the skills for jobs that are available. they want a chance to earn a life for themselves in a better future for the children. what better chance than now? it all starts with the people in the kitchens of our hotels and the landscaping crews that work in our neighborhoods and the late-night janitorial shifts that clean our offices -- that is where you will find the genes that america was built upon -- dreams that america was built on. their journey is our nation's destiny. if they can gave
all kinds of bonds, which is debt of cities and countries and states. of course there is the federal debt. as i recall, some people with fiduciary responsibility are only allowed to select investments that have very high ratings. the highest raiders in the world, at one time -- rated in the world, at one time, was the united states of america. and widows and orphans funds will invest in government bonds. host: alma, thank you for your call. we will consider your suggestion. the senate banking, housing and urban affairs committee is about to hold a hearing on the oversight of the fha program. shaun donovan will be testifying. we will be going to that as soon as that hearing begins. i want to show you this article in "the new york times took ." president obama plans to ask congress for about $50 billion for emergency funds to help rebuild the state's the were ravaged by hurricane sandy. regional leaders complained wednesday it was not enough. the white house will send the proposal to capitol hill this week. it should be between $45,000,000,000.50 $5 billion, according to officials -- $
city, albany, saturday and noon eastern on c-span 2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on cspan 3. up next, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined by former obama administers an adviser on iran to discusses the iranian nuclear program. and the foundation for the defense of democracies, this is one hour. >> good morning, it is a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. i want to quickly set the stage -- i don't need to tell anyone in this room about the death of the problem of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read briefly from the report that the u.n. special wrote and file to the u.n. general assembly in september of 2011 when there was a pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special reperteur on human rights. in september, 2011, the un secretary-general submitted a report to the general assembly in which he said he was "deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions, amputations, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, torture, and
the history of new york city, albany. next, a discussion on the impact of the so-called fiscal cliff on unemployment insurance. then a forum on skilled immigrant labor and the american economy. after that, speaker john boehner and representative pelosi on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all of the services that we have end up having cracks that they are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you need to step back and ask -- are we hurting people overall on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? now we have the institute of medicine report to think. 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? 30% of the medications that we describe? the procedures? this is something that is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. healthcare industry. dr. marty makary on his book " unaccountable." on c-span 2. >> it is estimated that it would cost -- [indiscernible] [bells ringing] >> i chose to honor both. the sacrifice of american se
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> explore the history and literary culture of new york's capitol city albany. this week on "book tv" and american history tv. up next on c-span, shaun donovan discusses the finances of the federal housing administration. then the senate debate on that debt ceiling. followed by the joint economic committee hearing on the so- called fiscal cliff. >> extended unemployment benefits for workers who have been jobless for more than 26 weeks expire in january. the exploration -- the expiration is part of fiscal cliff. on "washington journal", we will look at the expiring unemployment benefits. then our roundtable with michael tanner of the cato institute. "washington journal" is live every day on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the chief of staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated the land on -- would cost 250,000 of our men, and 500,000 on -- >> as harry truman's grandson, i have to choose to honor -- the sacrifice and the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific a
of new york's capital city, albany, saturday on "poke t.d.." -- "book tv." >> in a few
-74. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and the literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we want to welcome back to our table congressman tom cole, republican of oklahoma. let began with the news. john boehner send a proposal to the white house yesterday. what do you think? guest: it is a great opening start and makes it very tangible what the speaker committed to after the election. which is we are going to put revenue on the table. that is an enormous step forward by the republicans. not something we want to do but something we recognize we have to do to get there. i think the proposal to rex us toward where the real problems are which is entitlement spending. we cannot solve this with just revenue. while we like the paul ryan budget, the speaker basically picked up elements of some of the proposal from erskine bowles in an effort to try to reach forward. i think the speaker should be given a lot of credit for a great opening position. host: so, loopholes and deductions tha
scenes at the history of new york capital city, albany saturday at noon eastern on book tv and on c-span2 >> house r house speaker told reporters the white house has wasted another week on negotiations over the fiscal cliff. >> this isn't a progress report because there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and jobs the white house has wasted another week. secretary geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on and had more stimulus spending than in cuts. and an indefinite increase in the debt limit like for ever. now four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there has been no count offer from the white house. instead reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, un
happen if there is a nuclear explosion goes off in a city? everything has to be done to prevent it. the middle east is unfortunately the breeding ground for the terrorist that may do it. as time goes on, they will become more technically capable. when i worked on it in the task force, there were not that many terrorist groups that could even think about building a nuclear weapon. that, unfortunately, is changing. >> overtime is up. after a year of working with you, despite the gravity of the threat, i feel better knowing that american national security is in the hands of such exports. please give them a round of applause. now i will introduce -- he will introduce senator lieberman and senator kyl. please keep your seats. >> good afternoon. i am a long time fdd board member. i have the opportunity to introduce to distinguished leaders, senator joseph lieberman and senator jon kyl. though they came from different parties, on the most important issues they have fought on the same side. indeed, few states and have done more to advance the cause of freedom, human rights, and democratic
city, saturday at noon eastern. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy and with the greatest threat to economic -- says the greatest threat to economic security is dependent on foreign oil. they are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production and improving conservation, to reduce revenue and decrease our debt. >> good evening. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's and leaders of our time i want to give of thanks to the staff. we stand on their shoulders and the hard work and time they spent with the leadership council, the policies staff to put these events together, our public local staff we did our political staff and the rest. we are seeing more production than we have seen before. the last couple decades of year on year growth. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons, yet we continue to have a problem. i think the report we are , its subtitley compan says it all, are missing american resources. how do we leverage the abundance we have in the united states to our maximu
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)